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Worlds Without End Blog

2017 Andre Norton Award Winner! Posted at 8:10 AM by Dave Post

Dave Post

Arabella of MarsThe Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America have announced the winner of the 2017 Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy:

Arabella of Mars by David D. Levine (Tor)

The award was announced with the Nebula winners over the weekend.

Our congrats to David D. Levine and all the nominees:

What do you think of this result?

2016 Nebula Award Winner! Posted at 8:00 AM by Dave Post

Dave Post

All the Birds in the SkyNebula Awards

The 2016 Nebula Awards were presented at a ceremony held in the Pittsburgh Marriott City Center in Pennsylvania on the evening of May 20, 2017. The best novel winner is:

All the Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders (Tor; Titan)

Our congrats to Charlie Jane Anders and all the other nominees.

Locus has the full list of winners in all categories.

All the Birds in the Sky is up for the 2017 Hugo Award and the 2017 Locus Fantasy Award and, with this win, has made it onto our Award Winning Books by Women Authors list.

What do you think of this result?

Star Trek: Discovery – First Look Trailer Posted at 11:09 PM by Dave Post

Dave Post

So we finally get to see what the new Trek is going to look like. Well, not too bad I’d say though the trailer is not quite as exciting as I would have liked. What do you think?

2017 Locus Award Finalists Posted at 2:33 PM by Dave Post

Dave Post

The finalists for the 2017 Locus Awards have been announced. Here they are for the novel categories:

Company Town The Medusa Chronicles Take Back the Sky Visitor Babylon's Ashes Death's End After Atlas Central Station The Underground Railroad Last Year

Locus Science Fiction Novel:

 

All the Birds in the Sky Summerlong City of Blades The Obelisk Gate Children of Earth and Sky The Wall of Storms The Last Days of New Paris The Winged Histories The Nightmare Stacks Necessity

Locus Fantasy Novel:

 

The Reader Waypoint Kangaroo The Star-Touched Queen The Girl From Everywhere Roses and Rot Ninefox Gambit Arabella of Mars Infomocracy Everfair Vigil

Locus First Novel:

 

Crooked Kingdom The Girl Who Drank the Moon Double Down Truthwitch Poisoned Blade Burning Midnight Goldenhand Revenger This Savage Song The Evil Wizard Smallbone

Locus Young Adult Book:

 

For the complete list of noms in all categories check out the official press release from Locus. Winners will be announced during the Locus Awards Weekend in Seattle WA, June 23-25, 2017; Connie Willis will MC the awards ceremony.  Our congratulations to all the nominees!

What do you think of these lists? Any surprises? Any favorites?  How do you like the expanded 10 noms per category?

What’s Your Science Fiction Fantasy? Posted at 11:07 AM by James Wallace Harris

jwharris28

Have you ever wanted to write a science fiction novel? Do you picture yourself as the hero? Be honest – do you have what it takes to be a great protagonist? And just what kind of adventure would you want to have?

Novels, unlike real life, and especially for science fiction, can be about anything. But let’s get really far out. Let’s imagine you have died, and you regain consciousness. You’re in an empty room with another being. Let’s not be so pedestrian as to call it God. Let’s just say it’s a very advanced being with great powers. The being tells you how reincarnation works. You can now be sent anywhere in the multiverse to live again. Just pick. The multiverse is so infinite anything you can imagine exists somewhere. Just think what you want. Or you can volunteer to be randomly placed.

Do you have a favorite book or movie you’d like to live? Have you been refining a personal fantasy for years you want to try out? Think hard and long, because like a Genie with three wishes, your decision can come back to bite you in the ass. Do you want to stay on Earth, or venture out into the solar system, or beyond? Do you want to be rich? Have lots of sex? Travel far and wide? Invent wonderful machines? Do great deeds? Be a great leader? Spend a lifetime being compassionate?

Think about your favorite novels. Good ones usually involve much adversity and danger. Have you ever read Replay by Ken Grimwood? Jeff Winston, the novel’s protagonist dies at 43 and wakes up back in 1963, in his 18-year-old body to live his life again. He remembers his first life, so he tries to make his second life better. It doesn’t work out like he plans. (Do plans ever work out like planned?) Jeff dies again and gets yet another chance. Thus the title. This 1986 novel came out well before Groundhog Day in 1993. This is one of my favorite fantasies.

When I was younger, I would have picked being a colonist on Mars. Either like Heinlein’s Red Planet or Robinson’s Red Mars. Or maybe a person using suspended animation to see the future like Heinlein’s The Door Into Summer. Of course, having a time machine like the traveler in H. G. Wells’ The Time Machine would be fantastic. I can’t think of anything more rewarding than going up and down the timeline of Earth to see what happens in both the past and the future.

However, I’d still pick the Ken Grimwood type of adventure. I’d like to reincarnate into my 12-year-old self and try this life again, starting in 1963. (Strange that Grimwood and I both picked 1963.) That was the year my family moved from Miami to South Carolina. I’ve always wondered if I could have convinced my folks to let me stay with my grandmother instead. She lived alone and managed an apartment building for old people. I even met a woman there who had been on the Titanic. My grandmother could have used the help, and I could have made a much better life knowing what I know now – if I had tried harder. It would be rewarding to live another life doing everything differently.

Hinduism invented the idea of reincarnation to improve the soul. It’s a rather elegant idea once you think about it. Especially, if you could reincarnate into your own life for a second try. It’s taken me almost seven decades to figure out how things work. Would knowing what I know now at puberty make much of a difference? It would be fascinating to find out.

Science fiction is really a literature of imagining alternate lives using all of time and space. Most of the time we explore wishes gone bad. I think that’s why I’ve always loved the twelve Heinlein juvenile novels the most of any science fiction stories. Those stories published from 1947-1958 had a lot of bad things happen to the characters, but the sense-of-wonder adventures made up for any of the sufferings.

If you have the time, leave a comment about the choice you’d make.

BLADE RUNNER 2049 – Official Trailer Posted at 3:30 PM by Dave Post

Dave Post

Starting to get excited by this one now that we get to see a bit more.  What do you think?

2016 Shirley Jackson Award Nominees Posted at 2:48 PM by Dave Post

Dave Post

The Girls The Wonder Lily Mongrels I'm Thinking of Ending Things Foxlowe

Shirley Jackson AwardThe nominees for the 2016 Shirley Jackson Award have been announced. The noms in the novel category are:

The Shirley Jackson Awards are voted upon by a jury of professional writers, editors, critics, and academics, with input from a Board of Advisors. The awards are given for the best work published in the preceding calendar year in the following categories: Novel, Novella, Novelette, Short Story, Single-Author Collection, and Edited Anthology. You can see the complete list of noms in all categories at LOCUS.

Our congrats to all the nominees! What do you like from this list? Any surprise inclusions?

THE DARK TOWER – Official Trailer (HD) Posted at 10:59 AM by Dave Post

Dave Post

Well, this looks pretty damn epic to me and I love Idris Elba and Matthew McConaughey so I’m in for sure. What do you think? How does this compare to the books from what little we’ve seen thus far?

2017 Arthur C. Clarke Award Shortlist Posted at 4:45 PM by Dave Post

Dave Post

A Closed and Common Orbit Ninefox Gambit After Atlas Occupy Me Central Station The Underground Railroad

The shortlist for the Arthur C. Clarke Award for best science fiction novel for 2017 have been announced. They are:

The winner will be announced July 27, 2017 and will be presented with a check for £2017.00 and the award itself, a commemorative engraved bookend.

So what do you think of this list? Any surprises for you? Which is your pick to win?

Are You Nostalgic for Old SF Art? Posted at 1:34 PM by James Wallace Harris

jwharris28

I recently joined two groups on Facebook devoted to science fiction art: Raypunk and Space Opera Pulp. It makes me wonder: How many people love science fiction art? Over the years I’ve encountered a number of blogs devoted to SF art like Joachim Boaz’s Science Fiction and Other Suspect Ruminations and 70s Sci-Fi Art. And more databases of covers from science fiction magazines are showing up, like The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction from Phil Stephensen-Payne’s giant website. Even the Internet Science Fiction Database has become much more cover oriented. If you search Pinterest for “science fiction art” you’ll get countless collections.

Raypunk features more modern SF artwork but does include some older stuff. Space Opera Pulp is exactly what it says, and more to my nostalgic tastes. I would love to include samples of art these sites provide but I’m not sure about the rules of copyright violations.

It would be a wonderful blogging project to show the evolution of science fiction art as it parallels written science fiction. But I’m not sure how when it comes to getting permissions to use artwork. For now, I’m showing screenshots to these sites as a colorful enticement to try them. Here are some of the covers from F&SF. If you go to the site and click on a thumbnail it will show the large view. However, if you love a particular cover search for it on Google using the image view. Often larger higher resolution images are available.

For my personal use, I just right-click on images, select “Save image as…” and then put them into my SF Art folder. I search for the best scan at the highest resolution, and use my computer’s desktop background as an art gallery, using John’s Background Switcher to change images. It’s available for free and works on Windows and Mac. For Linux, I use Variety Wallpaper Changer. These programs automatically switch desktop background images at set time intervals. Here’s what my current desktop looks like:

One idea for a visual essay would be to take a single topic, say Mars, and show how fiction and illustrations have changed over time. Go year-by-year describing stories, quoting them, and showing the illustrations. Of course, that’s just another project to put on my pile of projects-to-do, but it would be fun. If anyone knows about the copyright laws that would apply to such a project, leave a comment, please.

Another project would be to pick one artist, say Richard Powers, and show how their work changed with the science fiction times. ISFDB makes that easy. They list books by cover artist. I assume showing whole book covers are kosher when it comes to copyright.

That should allow a project showing all the covers for a particular book. Here’s the ISFDB page for Have Space Suit-Will Travel. It goes on and on.

But really, how many fans of SF art are out there? Is it in the hundreds, the thousands? I can’t imagine it in the tens of thousands, but maybe. Wouldn’t it be funny to find out if 167 people keep all those SF art websites going? I think they must come in two kinds. The folks that love the current work, and the folks that are nostalgic like me.

I think that because I believe that’s how people read science fiction. When you’re young you read new science fiction to imagine the future. When you’re old you read the old science fiction you loved when young and think about the past.

Here’s the desktop image as I finished this essay.