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Worlds Without End Blog

2017 Arthur C. Clarke Award Shortlist Posted at 4:45 PM by Dave Post

Dave Post

A Closed and Common Orbit Ninefox Gambit After Atlas Occupy Me Central Station The Underground Railroad

The shortlist for the Arthur C. Clarke Award for best science fiction novel for 2017 have been announced. They are:

The winner will be announced July 27, 2017 and will be presented with a check for £2017.00 and the award itself, a commemorative engraved bookend.

So what do you think of this list? Any surprises for you? Which is your pick to win?

Are You Nostalgic for Old SF Art? Posted at 1:34 PM by James Wallace Harris

jwharris28

I recently joined two groups on Facebook devoted to science fiction art: Raypunk and Space Opera Pulp. It makes me wonder: How many people love science fiction art? Over the years I’ve encountered a number of blogs devoted to SF art like Joachim Boaz’s Science Fiction and Other Suspect Ruminations and 70s Sci-Fi Art. And more databases of covers from science fiction magazines are showing up, like The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction from Phil Stephensen-Payne’s giant website. Even the Internet Science Fiction Database has become much more cover oriented. If you search Pinterest for “science fiction art” you’ll get countless collections.

Raypunk features more modern SF artwork but does include some older stuff. Space Opera Pulp is exactly what it says, and more to my nostalgic tastes. I would love to include samples of art these sites provide but I’m not sure about the rules of copyright violations.

It would be a wonderful blogging project to show the evolution of science fiction art as it parallels written science fiction. But I’m not sure how when it comes to getting permissions to use artwork. For now, I’m showing screenshots to these sites as a colorful enticement to try them. Here are some of the covers from F&SF. If you go to the site and click on a thumbnail it will show the large view. However, if you love a particular cover search for it on Google using the image view. Often larger higher resolution images are available.

For my personal use, I just right-click on images, select “Save image as…” and then put them into my SF Art folder. I search for the best scan at the highest resolution, and use my computer’s desktop background as an art gallery, using John’s Background Switcher to change images. It’s available for free and works on Windows and Mac. For Linux, I use Variety Wallpaper Changer. These programs automatically switch desktop background images at set time intervals. Here’s what my current desktop looks like:

One idea for a visual essay would be to take a single topic, say Mars, and show how fiction and illustrations have changed over time. Go year-by-year describing stories, quoting them, and showing the illustrations. Of course, that’s just another project to put on my pile of projects-to-do, but it would be fun. If anyone knows about the copyright laws that would apply to such a project, leave a comment, please.

Another project would be to pick one artist, say Richard Powers, and show how their work changed with the science fiction times. ISFDB makes that easy. They list books by cover artist. I assume showing whole book covers are kosher when it comes to copyright.

That should allow a project showing all the covers for a particular book. Here’s the ISFDB page for Have Space Suit-Will Travel. It goes on and on.

But really, how many fans of SF art are out there? Is it in the hundreds, the thousands? I can’t imagine it in the tens of thousands, but maybe. Wouldn’t it be funny to find out if 167 people keep all those SF art websites going? I think they must come in two kinds. The folks that love the current work, and the folks that are nostalgic like me.

I think that because I believe that’s how people read science fiction. When you’re young you read new science fiction to imagine the future. When you’re old you read the old science fiction you loved when young and think about the past.

Here’s the desktop image as I finished this essay.

2016 Bram Stoker Award Winner! Posted at 11:05 AM by Dave Post

Dave Post

Bram Stoker Award The FishermanThe Horror Writers Association have announced the 2016 Bram Stoker Award winners. The winner for Superior Achievement in a Novel is:

The Fisherman by John Langan (Word Horde)

Our congrats to John and all the nominees.

The award presentation occurred during the second annual StokerCon aboard the Queen Mary in Long Beach, California on the evening of April 29, 2017. See the complete list of winners in all categories at Locus.

What do you think of this result?

2017 David Gemmell Legend and Morningstar Awards Shortlists Posted at 8:00 AM by Dave Post

Dave Post

The finalists for the 2017 David Gemmel Legend and David Gemmel Morningstar awards have been announced. Voting is open until midnight on June 2, 2017 (GMT).

 

Wrath Nevernight The Wheel of Osheim The Bands of Mourning Warbeast David Gemmel Legend Award

The Legend Award for Best Fantasy Novel:

 


Infernal Duskfall Steal the Sky Snakewood Hope and Red David Gemmell Morningstar Award

The Morningstar Award for Best Fantasy Newcomer:

 

The winners will be honored at a ceremony July 15, 2017 at Edge-Lit 6 in Derby, UK. For more, see the official Gemmell Awards website.

What do you think of these finalists? Anything surprise you on the list? What are your picks?

2016 Philip K. Dick Award Winner! Posted at 7:00 AM by Dave Post

Dave Post

The Mercy Journals Unpronounceable

The winner of the 2016 Philip K. Dick Award for distinguished original science fiction paperback published for the first time during 2016 in the U.S.A. is: The Mercy Journals by Claudia Casper.  Special Citation was given to Unpronounceable by Susan diRende.

The PKD Award was presented at Norwescon 39 on March 26.  Here’s a link to a video recording of the event: PKD Award ceremony – 2016

Our congrats to the winner and all the nominees.

2016 BSFA Award Winner! Posted at 12:51 PM by Dave Post

Dave Post

BSFAEurope in WinterThe British Science Fiction Association is delighted to announce the winners of the BSFA Awards for works published in 2016.

In the Best Novel category the winner is Europe in Winter by Dave Hutchison.  Our congrats to Dave and all the nominees:

 

See the official press release for more details.

What do you think of this result?

2016 Aurealis Award Winners Posted at 10:28 PM by Dave Post

Dave Post

The winners of the 2016 Aurealis Award have been announced. The winners in the SF, Fantasy, and Horror novel categories are:

Gemina

BEST SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL

  • WINNER: Gemima by Amy Kaufman & Jay Kristoff (Allen & Unwin)
  • Watershed by Jane Abbott (Penguin Random House)
  • Confluence by S.K. Dunstall (Ace)
  • Squid’s Grief by DK Mok (self-published)
  • Stiletto by Daniel O’Malley (HarperCollins)
  • Threader by Rebekah Turner (Harlequin Australia)

 

Nevernight

BEST FANTASY NOVEL

 

The Grief Hole

BEST HORROR NOVEL

 

Locus has the details for the winners in all categories.  Looks like a banner night for Jay Kristoff who won the Fantasy Award and the SF Award as co-writer with Amy Kaufman.  Well done, Sir.  Our congrats to all the winners and nominees.

Star Wars: The Last Jedi Official Teaser Posted at 1:15 PM by Dave Post

Dave Post

Well, it looks great — as most things Star Wars do — which mean it will disappoint — as most things Star Wars do. Still, it could be good.

Thor: Ragnarok Teaser Trailer [HD] Posted at 8:38 AM by Dave Post

Dave Post

Oh my. Thor is in trouble this time. Looks like fun to me. What say you?

Life Imitates Art Posted at 8:16 AM by Rico Simpkins

icowrich

Presented without comment:

Hat tip: Tom Gauld (for Friday’s Guardian Review).